Exercise Can Slow Onset of Alzheimer’s Memory Loss

Exercise Can Slow Onset of Alzheimer's Memory Loss | Alzheimeric.comKeeping active can slow down the progression of memory loss in people with Alzheimer’s disease, a study has shown. A team of researchers from The University of Nottingham has identified a stress hormone produced during moderate exercise that may protect the brain from memory changes related to the disease.

The work, funded by Research into Ageing (Age UK) and the University and published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, may also explain why people who are susceptible to stress are at more risk of developing the disease.

Source: Exercise can slow onset of Alzheimer’s memory loss, study reports

Brain Pacemaker for Alzheimer’s Disease

Brain Pacemaker for Alzheimer's Disease | Alzheimeric.comLast October, 57-year-old Kathy Sanford underwent groundbreaking surgery to have a pacemaker implanted in her brain to help with the effects of early onset Alzheimer’s Disease.

To see how well it’s working, Sanford is given tests in which she’s asked to highlight certain shapes. Her father Joe Jester says the first time she took the test she was barely able to identify any.

Jester says, ” Then they turned the machine on, and she got 30. So, it was a dramatic improvement right there. We knew right then we were on to something.”

Source: Brain Pacemaker for Alzheimer’s Disease | wusa9.com

Daily Brisk Walking Can Avert Alzheimer’s: Study

A brisk walk a day switches on a brain process that can protect against Alzheimer’s, according to a new study.

A stress hormone produced during moderate exercise protects the brain from memory changes linked to the disease, found the study by the University of Nottingham.

The findings could also explain why people vulnerable to stress are at more risk of developing dementia, researchers believe.

Resistance to Dementia May Run in the Family

Resistance to Dementia May Run in the Family | Alzheimeric.comPeople who are free of dementia and have high levels of a protein that indicates the presence of inflammation have relatives who are more likely to avoid the disease as well, according to a new study published in the August 15, 2012, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.